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Kootenay

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I own a 8 year old quartehorse mare who has only been greenbroke as a youngster.

She halters fine-(most of the time)--great with her feet--acts like an old pro. She's great to brush and wipe fly spray on her. My problem. She's (I think over 15 hands), and i'm afraid to take that first ride on her. I don't want to end up with a broken back/injuries/etc.

I was going to restart her this spring, when i found out she doesn't lunge on the long line-----not even close. It was a disaster. She went outwards on the circle both times I tried, and turned me into the equivalent of a 105lb., four foot eleven, human kite. I have a fear due to a young quartehorse having a bucking fit while being mounted-(I was the one on the ground holding the reins), and being trampled and having my ankle broken so badly that amputation was almost the last resort. I carry metal on both side of my ankle bone to this day.

I cannot afford a trainer--no way--no how. I know I could train if I had a round pen, but I don't even have that. I don't want to saddle/bridle this horse, and hop on knowing she may kill me when I try and ride her in my fenced off section of field. I guess my big question is--should I sell her to someone who has the proper facilities?. She does apparently have papers--although I have been trying to get ahold of those since last October.

I wanted a horse I could ride---even a nice project, but I don't want to be killed or injured. This horse is an Appendix Quarterhorse, so she has a ton of energy/spirit, and I have seen her buck "for fun" . I sure wouldn't want to sit that out.

I don't know if i'm feeling "chicken" or what. A big part of me says sell her, and wait for a nice faithful trail horse to come along.

Thoughts?--(I'm so undecided--and feeling bad I can't train this one properly).

Thanks in advance:

:Kim
 
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Shari

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If you are not sure how to handle or train her. And if you can't afford to send her to a good trainer... I would say sell her.

I have found it best to listen to ones gut instincts. You are not being chicken..you are being smart.

Since you are already dinged so to speak...is better to take the time to find one that has "real" miles on it with good training.

That way you can enjoy riding without the green horse worries.
 

mininik

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"A big part of me says sell her, and wait for a nice faithful trail horse to come along."

Listen to your instincts. You've already been seriously injured, are not set up for training and you are not financially, physically or mentally able to handle this project properly. It's sad for the horse since being trained is likely going to be her ticket to the future, but if you're not in a hurry you'll probably be able to find someone to take her on who can handle the responsibility.
 

Kootenay

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Honey has her days here paid for as far as vetting/worming/feet/feed is concerned, so i'm not in a hurry to sell her. She can stay here as long as it takes to find that right home for her. I would never have taken her in the first place if I couldn't afford her. It's those extras--like a roundpen that take their toll--that I can't afford.

She's such a nice, sweet horse also--always in your pocket--(not though when I first got her). She has a ton of potential--and she's beautiful. I just wish I hadn't failed her.
 

Kootenay

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Have to add: I have put a bridle on her, and help getting a leg up/and laying over her back. She was fine with that, but a bit "twitchy" with sudden movements--no biggie with time and effort. That is as far as I have gotten with her, and yes, my helmet was strapped on tighter than a turtle's shell.
 

Bess Kelly

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Have Bonnie talk with her and see what she's thinking........

She's still a young horse. An older, calmer, wiser animal could be a better choice for you. This one can feel your anticipation.
 

horseplay

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No thinking about it for me. Go with your gut, it's not worth the risk of getting badly hurt and even dying. I have been in the same place you are with a horse and did not go with the "feeling" I had and I paid severely. If you have reservations please find her a new home.
 

Jill

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You can be injured on any horse. Are you a very experienced rider? If not, I'm thinking an 8yo who's only ever been greenbroke may not become the best match EVEN with a good stretch with a professional trainer. A mind set is probably already in place. A serious, potentially disabling injury can be a lot more expensive than a good trainer and a new horse (sorry).
 

Charlene

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even if you do mount her and she does ok, think about how long it will be before she's truly safe. a green broke horse being ridden in an enclosed area at home where she's familiar with her surroundings is quite the opposite of a green broke horse out on the trails where spooks will jump out at her at every bend in the trail not to mention the occasional car that backfires or a sonic boom or a kid on a bicycle coming up behind you or, or, or...

i had a lovely arab gelding, got him as a 6 year old. he was barely halter broke. i worked with him for months just to be able to groom him. eventually, i tacked him up and he was perfect on a lunge line. after several years (yes, years!), i thought one day i would walk him home the 3 blocks and let him hang out in the yard. just walking down the lane, away from the barn, he positively freaked out. this horse had perfect ground manners, there wasn't anything i couldn't do with him. except ride him! i eventually re-homed him to a family that just wanted a pasture ornament.
 

SampleMM

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It sounds to me that Honey is a halter mare which is why she sets her feet so well. Most Quarters that have been exclusively haltered are bred to be halter horses not riding horses. Most true halter horses don't have the mind to do both. Now, this is not always the case but usually the case. Perhaps others have tried to ride the mare and had a bad experience so they switched her job back to a halter horse.

I have a 16 Hand Quarter Horse mare that is a gorgeous mover but you can bet your life that she would never give anyone a safe ride. She was bred to be beautiful. She was bred for muscles. She was bred to halter but never ever to ride. *Halter horses don't have the mindset to ride unless you are a trainer!*

I'm not trying to be harsh. I'm just very concerned for you welfare.
 
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Floridachick

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If she doesn't respect you on the ground there is no WAY she wil respect you in the saddle... Why even attempt to mount her if you can't lunge her or work her? Start slowly and gain confidence and start very very basic with her.. Please PLEASE don't get on that mare until your 100% confident you can! Also trying to sell a horse like her in this economy
You will be better off placing her for free with ref if YOU can even find a free forever home. goodluck she is cute
 

Laura

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[SIZE=12pt]I'd sell her. You're not comfortable with her. You need a safe, been there, done that, mature horse. Yes, accidents can happen with ANY horse, but if you start with a safer horse, it just makes sense that you will be safer. [/SIZE]
 

Bunnylady

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Oh, dear. Sounds like Honey got "lunge" mixed up with "launch!"


Honestly, I don't think she knew what she was supposed to do. If she was green-broke way back when, and she's 8 years old now, I doubt she remembers very much. Would she be better off with an experienced trainer? Probably. Would you be better off with an older, bomb-proof horse? Almost certainly. It sounds like you both have some issues. But, until both of your situations change for the better, I see no reason that you two can't work together.

First and foremost, stay safe. It doesn't help anyone for you to get hurt. I would take Honey all the way back to Kindergarten, and work on the basics. There's a lot of work you can do in-hand, it will build your confidence and teach her to listen to you. Start with walk, whoa, back, etc, all in hand. A round pen is helpful, but not critical. Obstacles can be fun, just take it slow. Assume this horse knows nothing, that everything is new to her, and make sure each step is solid before you go on to the next one.

Don't be in any hurry to get on this girl's back. I would ground-drive her in long lines for a while first.

You may never feel comfortable enough to ride this horse. That's okay too. But this way, your time together won't have been a waste, for either of you.
 

Reijel's Mom

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Oh, dear. Sounds like Honey got "lunge" mixed up with "launch!"


Honestly, I don't think she knew what she was supposed to do. If she was green-broke way back when, and she's 8 years old now, I doubt she remembers very much. Would she be better off with an experienced trainer? Probably. Would you be better off with an older, bomb-proof horse? Almost certainly. It sounds like you both have some issues. But, until both of your situations change for the better, I see no reason that you two can't work together.

First and foremost, stay safe. It doesn't help anyone for you to get hurt. I would take Honey all the way back to Kindergarten, and work on the basics. There's a lot of work you can do in-hand, it will build your confidence and teach her to listen to you. Start with walk, whoa, back, etc, all in hand. A round pen is helpful, but not critical. Obstacles can be fun, just take it slow. Assume this horse knows nothing, that everything is new to her, and make sure each step is solid before you go on to the next one.

Don't be in any hurry to get on this girl's back. I would ground-drive her in long lines for a while first.

You may never feel comfortable enough to ride this horse. That's okay too. But this way, your time together won't have been a waste, for either of you.
This is really great advice. It may really help this horse out to give her a foundation before you look to sell/place her somewhere else.

Are you 100% sure you can't afford to have a reputable trainer put 30 days on her to see what this mare knows/doesn't know?

Not judging you, I know what it is to have tight finances. It's just that she might be worth the investment. . .

I'm going through the same thing right now with a green horse.
 

Slinkky

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Have you thought about trading her? There might be someone with a quite/gentle horse that is looking for one with more spark. Put an ad on Craigslist, at the vet, stables/boarding facilities.
 

Kootenay

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Sorry for not getting back to this thread sooner--(busy around here).

I'm all for not keeping this horse. I cannot justify getting hurt over a leisurely ride--(and yes--I have riding experience). Since the age of five I have been on and around horses, and I didn't think my confidence would still be hanging by a thin thread due to my past accident.

I for sure think trading her for a quieter mount would be the way to go--(maybe not a horse as big a she mind you). I'll start putting up fliers this weekend, and posting her ad on websites. This mare does have potential to make someone a really nice horse---just not here.

Thank you for all the advice posted. I have thought long and hard enough about this, and I think i'm making a good decision.

:Kim
 

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