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advise for long hauls

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jandjmc

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Hi all;

I'm getting ready to have my 8 year old gelding hauled for about 1000 miles. Can I get some words of wisdom about:

*how to prepare the horse?

*what type of hay should I send?

*things to look for when the hauler shows up?

*anything you would recommend to make it easier on my guy!

Thanks bunch!!!
 

targetsmom

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A couple of things I have done: I would give him Gastrogard a day or two before shipment, right before loading, and if possible, ask the hauler to dose once a day en route with the tube you give them. I also like to ship mine in breakaway halters if they are going to leave halters on. I would send whatever hay your guy is used to - this is not a time to be switching feed. The shipper probably won't give grain while hauling, but you should send some grain for them to have on the other end. Ask if they have room for that.

I always like to know how many horses are going to be on the trailer and where they are going. I don't want them alone during any part of the trip but also don't like them going a long way out of the way. Once the hauler shows up, it is probably a bit late to look for things. I would (and do) ask questions during the selection process. Low bid is not always the best choice. Ask them how to track them en route anyway - of when you can expect progress reports.

Hoping for a safe journey!
 

SugaryCharm

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targetsmom had a lot of good advice.
I would add that if your gelding is a "fussy drinker" or does not like water that's different from what you have at home, you might start adding electrolytes or flavored jello powder to his water 4 days to a week before the trip. You need to start early so that he gets used to it and (if you use electrolytes) so he has a chance to rebalance his system. Then send a bit with him so he will continue to drink en route and upon arrival at his destination.

I hope this helps and that he has a safe journey!
 
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Lil Eowyn

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I would have him wear leg protections/shipping boots. Have the hauler stop at least every 4 hours for a drink and maybe take him out of the trailer and lunge him or something. Good luck! =)
 

Marsha Cassada

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I traveled with someone a year ago when she hauled her big and little horses 850 miles. The big horse was hard to load. We had to back up to a chute to get her in the trailer. She traveled fine, but we spent the night half way and made the mistake of taking her out of the trailer and penning her during the night. We had a devilish time getting her in the trailer again next day. Ended up having to fabricate a makeshift chute. If your horse is hard to load, I would not unload her. Just resting from the movement of the vehicle is enough. This trailer was a 2 horse slant load, and she would have had room to lie down, if she chose, in the night. Travel time is not a good time to teach a horse to load in a trailer!

The little horse was easy. He jumped in and out and we put him in the back yard of the place we stayed overnight.

We were not stopped for health checks at borders of 3 states, but she did have her health papers.

Both horses traveled great and had no problems.
 

rbrown

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Ditto the Ulcergard/gastrogaurd. I'm still dealing with ulcer issues with my mare that I'm almost positive were a result of her long-distance trip over a year ago. I did not use shipping boots as I didn't want them to slip, and wasn't going to rely on the hauler to fix/adjust them constantly. Several people also recommended going without boots/wraps for the longer trips. Good luck! Hope everything goes well.
 

ruffian

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Send the hay he's used to eating. Send extra because they usually pull it down out of the feeders and end up wasting a lot. NO HAY BAGS!!!
 

jandjmc

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Thank you all. I'll use the gastroguard and send with his hay.........He loads well so that won't be a problem.
 

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