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roxy's_mom

Laminatic mare with sore winter feet...

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Hey all! I have a laminatic mare that we've had trouble with the last two years. We've finally got things figured out as to how to deal with her sore feet. She's kept a steady weight since this all began two years ago. Her feet are still sore off and on. She would start to get sound again and just when we would think things were all good it would start all over with the sore feet and it would be months until it was better again. I don't want to keep her medicated all winter long just so she's comfortable. With the help of my vet and a friend that has dealt with laminitis in the past we've come up with plans.

 

Summer time my mare is turned out on a dry lot with little to no access to green grass. Winter time she will be stall when the ground is pointy and frozen solid. Until the last month or so my mare was really getting around good. Now that the weather has been cool and the ground getting colder she's having trouble walking. We are considering putting a heated floor in her part of the barn so that the ground would be warmer making it easier on her feet. Until we decide to do that or not I need help from you guys.

 

I don't want to keep this mare on meds all fall/winter long (running from Oct thru April) and risk messing her stomach up with ulcers. I have soaking boots but they only rub the back of her heels raw after a couple days use. I need something that will cushion the soles of her feet and maybe keep out part of cold. What would be your suggestion for boots or anything else?

 

Thanks for all your help!! Any ideas are welcome!!

 

Becky M.

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I read somewhere old mouse pads duct taped onto her feet? You would have to retape every few days, but it's cushiony and they are pretty tough.

 

Lucy

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Becky, the last thing you want to do is heat up the floor. You want to keep the heat in the feet cool, so heating the floor would be backwards to what you need to accomplish. Your horse sounds more foundered than laminitic if he hasn't been able to maintain getting stablized. You need a Pete Ramey trained barefoot trimmer. If you need help locating one, contact me. Did you get X Rays?

 

Soaking boots are not made for her to walk around in at all so don't use them for anything except soaking. To help her get around I highly recomment the boots that can be found here:

http://www.easycareinc.com/our_boots/easyb...boot_glove.aspx

The best boots for a job like this are the Boa, The Old Mac or the Old Mac G2. The other boots will not help you. You need to call the company so they can get them in your horse's size. Ask for Garrett if the gal at the front desk can't help you with a small size. You cannot leave them 24-7. Put them on when you put your horse outside, then take them off when he/she comes back into the stall. Be sure she is heavily bedded.

 

The best diet I have found that is easy is Purina Horse Chow 100 and hay.

Some of the best supplments I have found are:

Remission

http://www.jeffersequine.com/ssc/product.a...;cmkw=remission

and Cipex

 

http://www.jeffersequine.com/ssc/product.a...&cmkw=cipex

with MSM

http://www.jeffersequine.com/ssc/product.a...GX4J4CW99BE6696

 

Sometimes we combine any of the above for a hard case. Remember that sometimes if he/she is having a ruff time you will need to dose with bute even though you don't want to, and keep her on ulcer meds with it accordingly.

Hope this helps.

 

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Another tip I read about the lamanitic horse in the winter is to provide a loafing area with 4-6 inches of pea gravel in it. It doesn't freeze, supports the sole of the horse and doesn't make those frozen hoof prints they have to tippy toe over. I have been using pea gravel for two years now in my paddock, my boys love it. I don't have anybody with laminitis, but I do see a difference of how they walk over the frozen ground. In the past they did the tippy toe routine, now they walk just fine all winter.. You just have to pick the poos with one of those small rakes. Getting ready to replenish mine very soon. Love it.

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Hoofwings, they are custom made for each little foot and won't come off, great to use for therapy, driving or any condition that their feet need some protection and cushion....just Google hoofwings and it will come up for you....good luck and hope she feels better..

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Marty,

 

My mare seems to walk alot better when the weather/ground is warm that's why we thought heating part of the barn would make things easier for her. She seems to get really sore and has trouble walking when the weather gets cold and the ground gets cold.

 

I have asked my vet several times about doing X-rays and checking to make sure that her coffin bone hasn't rotated any and he has told me that he doesn't think she has foundered or has rotated. I've tried everything to keep her comfortable but nothing seems to help. I've had her on Lamnasaver (per vets recommendations) never saw an improvement and she quit eating it a couple months later. I tried a herbal mixtured for laminitis but after a couple months of that my mare turned her nose up to and wouldn't even eat her food. She has been on Remission since at least June and doesn't have a problem with it. She showed improvement over the summer like she has before when the weather was nice and now that the weather is alot cooler we are back to square one with her being sore all the time.

 

We've decided to keep her stalled at night and/or during the day depending on how cold the ground and weather is. She will be spending alot of time in doors when the ground becomes frozen.

 

She's currently being fed 1 cup of Purina Stratagy 2x's daily with a small scoop of Remission 1x's daily with access to hay at all times.

 

I'm at my whits end as to how to keep her comfortable. That's why I came here because I knew there were other people who have dealt with this. I've also asked my vet about Cushings, IR, all the things that I thought it could possible be and he says she doesn't show any signs that would warrent doing the blood test for them. He's the only vet that will come to my location, all others are over an hour away and will only see animals at their office.

 

Thanks for all the info and advice everyone all is very welcome and appreciated!!

 

Becky M.

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I would highly recommend putting your mare on feed that is low NSC. Strategy is 28% NSC. Way, way too high for a laminitic horse! You need to feed something that is less than 15% ideally. If you need to feed a grain and plan to stay with Purina, their best choice would be their WellSolve L/S (low starch). At 11% NSC it's within reason. Dry lot and hay, too. What kind of hay are you feeding? It's best if you can soak it to remove sugar before feeding.

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I agree with Becky That is way to high of NSC. I have the best luck with Platform. And I just found out purina make it for Farnam. I also keep my mare on a thick bed,atleast 6 inches. I bet if you change to a low NSC you will see a differance in a week. I have been battleing with a mare since last winter and finally the last 4 months I have kept her sound. I have never had her tested, but i think she is IR. She has no signs of cushings. Also a good farrier is a must. And their feet grow faster and need done more often. Lorie

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We have an Arabian mare 22 y/o. She has terrible arthritis. We have put her on cotiflex powder, highly reccomended by my vet . He says it has the highest level of Glucosomine and Chondriten and MSM.

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Becky,

I was trying to find this thread and finally found it.

I have 2 laminatic mares that I have had on Equine Sr. along with various supplements.

I decided to check with a Purina representative to get their input and this is the email that I received:

 

For horses that have laminitis issues we recommend WellSolve L/S. It is a low sugar diet that contains no molasses, corn or oats. It also has Biotin added to help with hoof health. This formula provides an exceptional nutritional balance to support muscle, skin, hair coat and hoof health in a very low soluble carbohydrate formula for horses with extreme sensitivity to dietary starch and sugar. When fed as directed it will contain all of the vitamins, minerals and nutrients a horse needs per day. I have attached a feed tag that list all of the ingredients and feeding recommendations. I have also attached a feeding recommendations for minis. You should follow the recommendations that are listed for Equine Lifestyles which includes WellSolve L/S. If you have more questions please, let me know.

 

Pat Herndon

Animal Care Specialist

100 Danforth Drive

Gray Summit, MO 63039

Phone - 636-742-6216

Fax - 636-742-6170

1-800-227-8941

e-mail- PAHerndon@landolakes.com

 

This lady has been wonderful and a great source of information - she also sent me the feed tag and the feeding recommendations for minis. I am anxious to start my 2 mares on this to see how it will help -

 

 

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