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Nursing home visit


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#1 Nathan Luszcz

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 10:30 PM

I've been asked to bring Deacon to a nursing home. My barn manager is a teacher at a local school, and they do a little equine program as well. Her class is doing some service at a local nursing home, and somehow my little pony was brought up and invited to visit.

I'm all for the idea. I've spent a lot of time in nursing homes, both with my great grandmother as well as serving as an EMT with the local EMS. It would really put some smiles on their faces and brighten the day to have a little pony waltz into the room.

But at the same time I don't want to cause problems. I don't need a lawsuit on my hands for trying to do a good dead, nor do I want to make an issue out of nothing. Those of you that do bring your minis to nursing homes, what protection did you have? Deacon is wonderful, he's been in houses before, been "attacked" by little kids, and is very quiet and loving. I'm 95% sure he'd be great. But he's an animal, a stallion to boot, so there is always a chance of something, er, undesirable, happening.

And on the subject of undesirable, how did the homes accomidate you, and how did you accomidate them? What kind of arrangements were made?

Any insite would be greatly appreciated. I want to make an impact, but I want to be invited back, not be hauled into court. (although both would make quite an impact...)

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#2 Sandee

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 10:43 PM

I realize the liability could be a real problem; now having said that we went without any insurance. We were invited to a nuring home where a relative is staying and at the time we took one mini and our big horse. They set up all who could come outside in the parking lot and we put on a little show of tricks and then walked around and let them pet and feed the horses. We took some for rides in the cart with the mini and the staff asked to ride the big horse. The home furnished "smores" for the residents and everyone had a really good time. The staff very much appreicated our effort in coming there.
We were probably "lucky" that nothing happened but I can "read" my horses pretty well and would never have gone near the crowd if they were "acting up". My QH put her head right into people's laps that were in wheelchairs.
Just to show me who was boss though the next day at a fun show same horse tried to buck me off!
P.S. I know some take their horses inside but I wouldn't feel comfortable doing that (even minis). That's why we asked for the parking lot.

Edited by Sandee, 25 August 2006 - 10:45 PM.

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#3 lilhorseladie

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 11:03 PM

I visit nursing homes weekly. I do not have liability insurance, however, I have been told that since it is an "activity" that I would be covered by the home. This is my fourth year of going weekly. I have had a few accidents. Never in the 13 homes that I have gone to has it been a real problem. Some places, I just ask for a bag and pick it up or spray the carpet and sop it up. Many times they call house keeping who says that is one of the better messes they have cleaned up all day. I watch teeth an back legs at all times. The nice thing with nursing homes is that unlike the kids, the horse moves to the people, they usually don't flock to the horse. It is a great feeling to be with those people. That being said, I am hoping to get Delta certification on mine in order to have liability insurance, just in case. I would hate to have my good deed turn into someone elses fund raiser. Be smart, be careful and have fun.
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#4 Nathan Luszcz

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 11:08 PM

What is "delta certification"?

#5 lilhorseladie

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 11:18 PM

You can do a search on it, but it is for pet therapy animals. They have to be a certain age and then they go through testing where the tester will see if they kick, bite and react to different situations. It is mostly for dogs, but they do mini horses also. It costs you 75 dollars, but I think you get something like 1million dollars liability if you pass....Delta Society Someone here has theirs Delta Certified. There is also certification through different hospice programs I believe.

Who is it, was it HorseHugs with a delta certification? Anyone? Thanks

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This is a better Delta page to look at for info.
Staci MacDonald
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#6 tagalong

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 11:30 PM

I did nursing homes and hospitals without any problems - and was always invited back... but Nathan - the stallion issue could be problematical as far as potential hassles go.... of anything did go wrong - say someone got nibbled - the stallion issue would be the first thing that would be brought up.... potential liability issues there.

I took the minis inside as well as outside - including mares with foals. Vet wrap on their hooves helps with slippery linoleum floors... but we never had any issues or accidents in many years of visits.

Make sure the brakes are on on every wheelchair. Every mini I took in was very careful to lay their heads on the arms of wheel chairs or even in people's laps... and the light that shone in those eyes as gnarled and crippled hands stroked them made me tear up. One old fellow - who had not said a word to the staff in 3 years - started to babble about his old Clydesdale team... and he hugged Daisy until her eyes bugged out - but she never flinched. Not so much as an ear...

Wonderful memories.. wub.gif yes.gif

Edited by tagalong, 25 August 2006 - 11:31 PM.

Foaling rule #1... the most predictable thing about a mare is her unpredictability!!

#7 rabbitsfizz

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 03:14 AM

I would most certainly get someone at the home to sign a waiver before you go, putting in writing that you hold NO insurance and that you have been told that you are covered for accidents by the homes insurance.
I would also state that the animal is of sound temperament BUT an animal and and "accident" might happen.
I would NOT mention he is a stallion- EVERYONE seems to know that word!! If you do not mention it it will not arise.
As to relieving himself before the event- travel him there in an empty trailer.
Take him off the trailer.
Put down some nice clean straw/shavings and a dollop of mare poop and - well, there you go!!!!
Pop him back on for a few minutes and it will all be done in the trailer!! rolleyes.gif
Good Luck, by the way, this is a wonderful thing to do.
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#8 Jill

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 05:26 AM

I personally would not own horses without liability insurance, much less take them into a nursing home. You should speak with your insurance agent.
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#9 Soggy Bottom Ranch

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 06:33 AM

I just recently asked my insurance agent about this, and with our policy he said if we were asked to make a visit by the home we did not need additional coverage. But if we asked the home if we could visit, we would then need the liability coverage. He said if they ask us, then it is their policy that would cover us. I didn't get into asking him all the details yet about the insurance itself since neither I nor they had the time at that very moment, but I plan on it. This is near and dear to my heart............tagalong, your post brought tears to my eyes just thinking about that elderly man, and their faces beaming with joy. I've brought greeting cards to residents at nursing homes before, and although it can be so difficult, it is also so rewarding! yes.gif I'd love to find out more about this certification as well, and if it is something available in my area.
Geri

#10 Guest_Lisa-Ruff N Tuff Minis_*

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 08:25 AM

QUOTE(Jill @ Aug 26 2006, 04:26 AM) View Post

I personally would not own horses without liability insurance, much less take them into a nursing home. You should speak with your insurance agent.

I am in complete agreement with this. The cost of the liability is minimal compared to the cost of a law suit not only in a nursing home anywhere else. Home owners wont always cover you the way you think




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